High Percentage martial arts takes data from hundreds of fights, competition matches, and self defense situations to answer the question: What's truly high percentage?

 

Comparing Blue and White Belt Submission Times

Comparing Blue and White Belt Submission Times

This is a follow up to our article in which we watched one hundred white belt submissions and what we could learn from it. We said in that article that to get the real juicy info, we needed data from other belt levels. Well, we go one hundred more sweet, sweet data points to play with and here’s the results.

What We Did:

We watched one hundred more matches, all at blue belt this time. half of them where gi and the other half nogi. We did not distinguish between various competition formats, or males and females. Neither did we factor in weight (often this is impossible anyways).

Every time there was a submission we marked what it was an when it happened. We went by the timestamp of the video, not the official match clock since it’s often not visible during matches. Also, we always subtracted out times when the opening seconds of the video contained pre-match footage.

Here’s the major takeaways:

Blue Belts Are Far More Dangerous In The First Minute

Sweet Jesus! Blue belts were 400% more likely to finish matches within thirty seconds.

Sweet Jesus! Blue belts were 400% more likely to finish matches within thirty seconds.

Contributing to our data that shows Blue belts are significantly more skilled than white belts, they consistently had faster submission rates than white belts. Across the board this meant they finished matches about nine seconds faster than white belts, which might not be too impressive. But when you look at matches that ended in the first minute, Blue Belts were 33% more likely to finish in the first minute, and more than 400% more likely to finish in the first thirty seconds!

Nogi Matches Have More Early Finishes

nogi vs. gi.png

For the most part, there were no radical differences between gi and no gi submissions. Both occurred on average at just under two minutes. However, nogi matches were notably more likely to end early. When we look at matches that ended in under a minute, no gi matches ended ten seconds faster on average.

Leglocks and Armbars Are Powerful Early Finishers


Making this chart took a piece of my soul. . .

Making this chart took a piece of my soul. . .

Ok, this data can be a little misleading. For one, there weren’t a ton of leglocks in these two hundred matches, only ten (we counted footlocks and straight ankle locks as the same submission). However, they did make up a larger percentage of early finishes than anything else.

Armbars also dominated early matches. That said, you can see from the chart that armbars are very well represented at all times in matches. This lends more credence to something we are firmly starting to believe here at High Percentage: Armbars are the most dominant submission in all of Brazilian Jiu-jitsu. Of course, we’re only saying that because we currently have a mountain of evidence, we’re open to changing our mind.

Big Takeaways

  • Blue Belts are more likely to attack early, watch yourself

  • Ankle and footlocks may be strong, early match submissions, Armbars are good at virtually any time, including early

  • Nogi matches are more likely to end early.

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